The Document Foundation Blog

2015/01/13

Behind the scenes at TDF: Infrastructure

Filed under: Community, Technology — Florian Effenberger @ 14:10
09.01.15 - 1

LibreOffice admin meeting in Munich, with Alex being the third person from the left

With the beginning of 2015, a new year packed with exciting projects and ideas around LibreOffice and The Document Foundation, we today finish our behind-the-scenes series, to share achievements in 2014 with our community and our generous donours, to whom we’d like to express our sincerest gratitude and thanks for their incredible and wonderful support and their invaluable contributions!

I’m Alexander Werner and I am responsible for the infrastructure of The Document Foundation on a contracted basis since March 2014. I have been with the project since its foundation in 2012, and been a longtime supporter of free and open source software. As a volunteer I helped setting up and maintaining our first server and optimizing it to handle the load of the first days.
The infrastructure is one of the most important things The Document Foundation provides for the community. As long as every part is working as expected, it is basically invisible. It is my job to make sure that this is always the case, mostly by orchestrating the different services on our growing number of virtual machines.

When the LibreOffice fork began, we started with only one server where all services were located – mailing lists, both private and public, website, mirror management, wiki and many more. As time went by, this server survived its first slashdot, but soon it became clear that more power was needed. So our infrastructure started growing organically as more and more servers were added. Our admins specialized on different parts of the infrastructure, while the whole configuration was centrally documented in a single ODT file.

It soon became clear that this was not a viable solution – our quest for infra 2.0, as we internally call it, began. The admin team worked under fast escalating load while looking for ways to optimize resource usage, inclusion of new volunteers, configuration documentation and management. Also high availablility of services became increasingly important. In our sparse free time we started creating concepts, tested HA with DRBD, Pacemaker and Heartbeat, evaluated different solutions for centralized documentation and started using tools for centralized configuration management.

It soon became clear that we needed more flexibility for working HA with the solution described above, so as interim solution we started virtualizing services first in paravirtualized guests with LXC and then switched to fully virtualized guests with KVM. For infrastructure documentation I suggested to use the documentation generator Sphinx. The source files for the documentation – human readable RST text files – are located in a git repository, and the online documentation is automatically updated on every push. For configuration management and deployment, I eventually stumbled upon SaltStack.

My daily work consists of working on various small recurring tasks such as helping people with mailing list troubles, adding and removing mirrors in MirrorBrain, installing updates and doing necessary reboots as well as handling unexpected incidents such as the Heartbleed bug.

In spring I started working on our Salt states, made them more reliable and made sure that all user accounts are now managed by Salt. I have setup a new virtualization host with VMs for Gerrit, Jenkins, Bugzilla and Plone. Apart from that I worked on improving the documentation of our services, looking for undocumented and unused services.

I also worked on our AskBot setup. While having set up the initial AskLibO instance, it was decided to contract Evgeny Fadeev, the primary developer of AskBot, to develop additional features needed by our community, which will then be made available upstream again. Despite that, I also did some changes such as enabling the newly-developed multilanguage support, fixed template bugs and administered the list of moderators.

Except for my ongoing work to improve the Salt states and adding more not yet managed servers to our Salt infrastructure, I also continued to concatenate various documentation sources into our centralized repository.

I also worked on a download counter that will be useful to track all our downloads by language, location, version and operating system.

But the most interesting, time consuming and fascinating part of my work was the planning, testing and setup of our new cluster/cloud infrastructure. As it was decided to virtualize all of our services, I looked for a solution that is easy to manage and maintain but provides powerful tools for easily creating highly available services.

After quite some time of evaluating I decided to go for oVirt – a KVM-based virtualization solution that provides a nice out-of-the-box experience, the simplicity of its setup was worlds apart from other solutions. It is also possible to provide fully high available services with only two nodes by having the management engine run as VM on the platform.

During the time of evaluation I also had contact to hardware suppliers and hosters, and after a good offer from manitu we decided to host our new platform on two large, dedicated servers, each with 256 GB RAM and 64 CPU cores. Until the end of the year, over 20 virtual machines were migrated and a third node was ordered that will be used primarily for crash testing and to increase the stability of the platform even more.

If you are interested in learning more about our infrastructure or helping out, consider subscribing to the website mailing list, where infra calls are announced or write a mail to alex@documentfoundation.org

2015/01/08

Behind the scenes at TDF: Executive Director

Filed under: Community, employees, Foundation — Florian Effenberger @ 11:23

With the beginning of 2015, a new year packed with exciting projects and ideas around LibreOffice and The Document Foundation, we continue our behind-the-scenes series, to share achievements in 2014 with our community and our generous donours, to whom we’d like to express our sincerest gratitude and thanks for their incredible and wonderful support and their invaluable contributions!

I’m Florian, and I live in the very southern part of Bavaria in Germany, 100 km southwest of Munich, near the border to Austria and Switzerland – a beautiful place to be. ;-)

Today, I’d like to shed a light on my role as Executive Director, a fulltime position which I have held since last March. With TDF having grown over the past years in terms of contributions, projects, ideas, staff and donations, my role as Executive Director is, in a nutshell, to keep everything together and have “the show running”, working for the Board of Directors and with the Membership Committee,floeff2012_400x400 and all the other wonderful volunteers, contributors and staff members like Sophie, Italo, Christian, Robinson and Alex.

Having worked intensively on the statutes and the initial setup of TDF, the first part of my role is taking care of many administrative, legal and tax bits, removing that burden from the board to give them more time for strategy and other items. This work reaches from working closely with our accountant, tax advisor, payroll provider and legal counsel, to dealing with trademark requests, protection of domain names, checking and payment of invoices, and reviewing contracts and insurances, making proposals for the investment of our capital stock and other funds, and of course answering questions on details of the statutes and other parameters of the German “Stiftung”.

The second part of my role is handling the daily operations, which includes replying to and distribution of all sorts of inquiries and requests, be it formal letters, user inquiries and, together with other TDF spokespeople, a variety of press and media inquiries. The daily operations also involve monitoring the budget, organizing our internal file storage, preparing presentations for the annual board meetings, participating in and proposing agenda items for the biweekly phone conferences, handling our donation mechanisms, bank accounts and donation confirmations, monitoring deadlines and working on relations to our Advisory Board. When a new Board of Directors or Membership Committee is elected, or we have new staff members, I have the honour of introducing them to our internal workflow and our entity.

The most exciting part of my job surely is working with our staff in various projects, and the coordination of tasks, deadlines, priorities. As Executive Director, I am responsible for oversight of all budget items and projects TDF is carrying out. At the end of 2013 we have switched to Redmine for project management – started out of the infrastructure team’s needs, it has become an important tool for task and project handling in some non-development parts of LibreOffice. In addition to that, we are running weekly team calls with our staff members, have slots reserved for weekly one-on-one calls, and meet in IRC regularly to discuss current projects and challenges. Every once in a while we also have in-person meetings, mostly during LibreOffice Conferences and FOSDEM. Being responsible for that part of the foundation also involved handling tender processes, job openings and talking to candidates who apply for a job.

We do have a couple of recurring projects, like gradually improving our AskBot instance or writing our formal annual report, but there’s also individual items, like the certification program, the Android tender and the Bugzilla migration.

Should I find some spare time during the weekends, I also like hacking around on our infrastructure, especially our e-mail system and our Redmine instance, and try to join our admin phone calls and infra in-person meetings when possible. Having been a part of the German community for many years, I also try to regularly organize community meetings and phone conferences.

Last but not least, every once in a while I give a presentation, staff a booth at an event, and sometimes I even make it to a magazine or try to say some wise words in a podcast or a lecture. ;-)

2014/12/22

Behind the scenes at TDF: L10N and NLP

Filed under: Community, employees, Foundation, Interviews, LibreOffice — Florian Effenberger @ 10:55

Towards the end of the year, The Document Foundation would like to share achievements in 2014 with our community and our generous donours, to whom we’d like to express our sincerest gratitude and thanks for their incredible and wonderful support and their invaluable contributions!

Sophie Gautier is in charge of our L10N and NLP projects at The Document Foundation, and gives you insight into this key part of our project:

_SDS5526L10n – NLPs status quo

I would like to give a brief overview of the many things that happened or are in the pipe either on the Localization project (L10n) or on the Native Language projects (NLPs). For the latter, it is not always easy to know what is going on locally, but we tend to get more and more feedback from these groups which is really great.

So, on the Localization side, several new languages were added to Pootle these last months, more Indic languages, for example. Translating UI and Help is a very huge task, and when you think it is finished, there is still some work to do for the next version. For example, currently, the teams are in the starting blocks to translate the 4.4.x new features strings and the various enhancements that have been provided by the Design team. Also the change of file format to .ui means that the l10n teams had to translate again all the dialogs. Fortunately, this change is of great help because the dialogs adapt to the length of the strings (no need anymore to count the characters in the word to fit the space), but we are also able to display those dialogs in Glade, allowing to see the strings in context, which is something all localizers are dreaming of! All in all, that makes many new words for both UI and Help projects. And this is not the only translation projects we handle via Pootle, there is also the Website, Impress for Android and iOS, sometimes AskBot projects.

Dedicated to newcomers of the l10n project, two guides have been written; one concerning how to use Pootle, the second one on the structure of .po files (for example, it shows how to distinguish variables or which xml tags are used). There was absolutely no documentation on the structure contents by the past and one had to guess what he had to translate or not. And it is very easy to break a build when tags miss or mismatch, so this brings some relief to the developers too.

Thanks to our Brazilian friends several of the help articles concerning new functions have been completed. We are also working on porting the translation of the help files on the wiki. This is a difficult task because we do not want to complicate the translation task on one hand, but we want to simplify the help maintenance and open it to non-technical contributors on the other hand, which is currently impossible. Some technical issues have still to be resolved, but we are optimistic that we will be able to set it in a near future. As a work in progress also, we hope to push the migration to a new version of Pootle, with an integrated translation memory.

On the Native Language projects side, we are happy to see more and more contributors to the local projects and really good news coming from several of them, like the Italian community or the Japanese and Chinese ones. They not only contribute to their local projects, but you can find those members active in QA, development or documentation.

One of the major tasks handled this year by these teams was the translation and adaptation of the new website design. During the year, the website itself was translated on Pootle and the content by website owners. This gives a uniformed design to all the language sites bringing more quality and a professional look and feel to our project.

One way to measure the growth of activities in these projects is how we all together manage the press releases. Once the text is fixed by the marketing project, the native language projects translate them and send them back to the marketing team for distribution to the press in their countries. We are now able to release in almost 9 languages for each major release. It is also something really exciting to see how the developers, the quality assurance, native language, design and marketing projects interact during the last month before the release. Of course it happens also all time between two or three of them, but the communication has improved between all of them.

Another great thing that has happened recently while in heavy discussion since some times, is the Planet in all languages. It is really impressive to see all those languages mixed in one thread but that you can filter by the language you prefer. There is currently ten languages available covering several blog writers.

Always trying to be as transparent as possible and to bring as much information to the community as we can, the Annual Report due as a TDF official document to the Berlin authorities, has been translated into English and is available to the Native Language projects for their own use, to inform either on the product and the community.

On the local side, TDF has supported several hackfests and numerous events have been organized all over the world by the Native Language Projects. And we are really happy that the Danish team is organizing the next international LibreOffice conference in Aarhus.

To reflect all this effervescence, we have set a Big Thank You page on the wiki, where all L10n and NLPs contributors are invited to add their name. But that’s not all, we have also a world map, detailing the skills of the contributor in addition to his location. And stay tuned, more is coming!

2014/12/19

Behind the scenes at TDF: Quality Assurance (QA)

Filed under: Community, employees, Interviews, LibreOffice, QA — Florian Effenberger @ 18:30

Towards the end of the year, The Document Foundation would like to share achievements in 2014 with our community and our generous donours, to whom we’d like to express our sincerest gratitude and thanks for their incredible and wonderful support and their invaluable contributions!

As a start, Robinson Tryon, who is in charge of Quality Assurance (QA) since August, and summarizes the efforts in this important area:robinson-in-brussels

Hi all,

I’m Robinson Tryon and I’m a QA Engineer for The Document Foundation. I became quite interested in computers in high school and got my first taste of Free Software playing around with RedHat Linux on a spare machine.

In college I started to study computer science in earnest, and found myself very interested in the topics of human-computer interaction and computing freedom. I can’t remember who first introduced me to the Free Software Foundation, but I have fond memories from my undergraduate years of attending annual membership meetings at MIT and thinking of how I’d like to get a job where I could spend my time working on Free Software.

In the years since I graduated with a degree in computer science, I’ve been fortunate to be able to work with a number of different organizations and labs on Free Software projects. I’ve worked on a multimedia engine used to create training simulations for doctors and first-responders, tools for teaching non-technical people how to use programs such as git and ssh, and a series of web-based games designed to help libraries, museums, and other organizations crowd-source metadata for images and video in their collections. I was very excited to join the Document Foundation this year and bring my experience to the LibreOffice project.

My first contributions to LibreOffice came early-on in 2010 when the project was just starting out. The renewed energy and community-focus espoused by the leaders heartened me, and the reduced barriers to contribution sounded very promising. I tested out new builds and made a few small edits to the wiki, but didn’t get seriously involved until a couple of years later. Up until that point, I was just a user.

When I was still in college, I remember running Sun’s OpenOffice.org off of a Knoppix LiveCD. I desperately wanted to find an alternative to running MS-Office to type up all of my papers and reports, and just using a text editor wasn’t quite cutting it. Although I wasn’t always able to work on my own desktop computer in my dorm room, carrying around a Knoppix CD made it possible for me to boot-up and run a Free Software office suite on the public cluster machines.

By the time LibreOffice had its first release, I had upgraded from the CD and could carry around Free Software programs on a USB stick, ready to be run on any computer. I currently carry a USB stick with builds of LibreOffice for Windows, GNU/Linux, and Mac. My thinking is that if a friend ever needs a hand opening documents on a computer, it’d be great for me to have the right tool ready to go for them. In fact, using LibreOffice to help out a friend is what got me very involved with LibreOffice and the QA Team.

A friend of mine had a large number of documents in proprietary formats (word processing, spreadsheet, etc..) and reading through the LibreOffice documentation I found out that the suite has some excellent tools for conversion of documents from one format to another, including the ability to bulk-convert via the command line one hundred documents as easily as one document. While I was doing my research, I started to chat with contributors to the LibreOffice project, I attended a couple of QA Meetings, and before I knew it was an active member of the QA Team!

When I first started out contributing to LibreOffice, I focused on some basic bug triage tasks and filled-in missing pages on the TDF wiki. As my understanding of the project and its members grew, I was able to make contributions to Bugzilla, to the BSA, and MediaWiki, and was able to help set up tools such as ownCloud. I currently work on a large number of different QA tasks for LibreOffice, including generating binary-bisection or “bibisect” repositories, improving and updating QA documentation on the TDF wiki, and overseeing the implementation of improvements to Bugzilla. Right now I’m gaining experience as a Release Engineer for LibreOffice.

In addition to the technical tasks I undertake for LibreOffice, I work on LibreOffice outreach — both in the US and abroad. Although we have a large number of active users, only a small fraction of them are active contributors. We are always looking to expand the number of contributors in each of our teams, and are excited about getting more people involved in QA through our BugHunting sessions and LibreFests.

A LibreFest is usually a one or two-day event in which various LibreOffice teams may participate. LibreFests, just like hackfests, are typically held in person, as that’s the best way for us to collaborate with and teach new contributors. When the QA Team participates in a LibreFest, users are asked to perform basic or advanced bug triage, to bibisect regressions, and to file new bugs that they observe. With experienced LibreOffice team members present, users feel much more comfortable stepping outside their comfort zone and taking on QA tasks that they wouldn’t try to tackle by themselves.

In our BugHunting sessions, we spend a weekend (usually Fri-Sun) testing the latest builds of a new Release Branch. One of the tools we use to test the builds is MozTrap — a test case management system that help to ensure greater reliability and consistency. Through extensive use of LibreOffice, we hope to shake-out any obvious bugs and squash them before going further in with the release process.

Speaking of BugHunting sessions, this weekend (Dec 19-21), we’ll be having a BugHunting session for the upcoming 4.4 Release Branch. We’ve worked to make it easy for newcomers to participate. To join in, or just for more information, see: https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/BugHunting_Session_4.4.0_RC1

LibreOffice 4.4.0 bug hunting sessionIf you’re looking for a way to participate in LibreOffice, or just curious about what we do in QA, please stop by our mailing list or our IRC channel. There’s so much more that we do that can’t be contained in a single blog post, and we’d love to tell you all about it!

2014/11/05

The Document Foundation (TDF) announces Certification for LibreOffice Migration and LibreOffice Training Professionals

Filed under: Announcements, Certification, Community, LibreOffice — Tags: , — italovignoli @ 13:00

Berlin, November 5, 2014 – The Document Foundation announces Certification for LibreOffice Migrations and LibreOffice Training Professionals, open to TDF Members until April 2015 and then to all free software advocates. Details are available at http://www.documentfoundation.org/certification.

“LibreOffice Certification is an absolute first for a community based project, and has been developed adapting existing best practices to the different reality of the TDF ecosystem,” says Italo Vignoli, Chairman of TDF Certification Committee. “We want to recognize the skills of free software advocates who are able to provide value added services to large organizations deploying LibreOffice. Once certified, they will be recognized as LibreOffice experts and ambassadors.”
The Certification Committee has also appointed several Certified Professionals for Migrations and Trainings, who will help the Board of Directors in peer reviewing other TDF Members who will apply for certification in either discipline.

Certified Professionals for Migrations and Trainings are: Lothar Becker (.riess), Eliane Domingos de Sousa (EDX Informatica), Sophie Gautier (independent), Olivier Hallot (EDX Informatica), Thomas Krumbein (independent), Leif Lodahl (Magenta), Marina Latini (Studio Storti), Cor Nouws (Nou&Off), Gustavo Buzzatti Pacheco (independent), Stefano Paggetti (Regione Umbria), Jacqueline Rahemipour (independent), Charles H. Schulz (independent), and Italo Vignoli (independent). These 13 certified professionals join the 42 developers certified since October 2010.

Certified Professionals are able to assist enterprise deployments of LibreOffice by providing the following services:

  • migration consultancy: migration feasibility assessment, project management, migration strategy, communications, and other migration related services;
  • training: creation and delivery of training courses for trainers and end users, and evaluation of training effectiveness;
  • professional Level 3 support: feature development and bug fixing to solve application and interoperability problems.

The lists of Certified Professionals can be accessed from the certification website: http://www.documentfoundation.org/certification.

About The Document Foundation (TDF)

The Document Foundation is an independent, self-governing and meritocratic organization, based on Free Software ethos and incorporated in Germany as a not for profit entity. TDF is focused on the development of LibreOffice – the best free office suite ever – chosen by the global community as the legitimate heir of OOo, and as such adopted by a growing number of public administrations, enterprises and SMBs for desktop productivity.

TDF is accessible to individuals and organizations who agree with its core values and participate in its activities. At the end of October 2014, the foundation has over 200 members and over 3,000 volunteer contributors worldwide.

2014/10/17

LibreOffice Conference 2015 in Aarhus, Denmark, from September 23 to September 25, 2015

Filed under: Announcements, Community, Conference, Foundation, Meetings — italovignoli @ 11:21

Aarhus WaterfrontBerlin, October 17, 2014 – The Document Foundation (TDF) announces that the LibreOffice Conference 2015 will be jointly organized by the Danish LibreOffice community in collaboration with local F/OSS groups and the Aarhus municipality, and hosted at the brand new Urban Media Space, from September 23 to September 25, 2015.

In addition, on September 22 the LibreOffice community will gather for several face-to-face meetings: Board of Directors, Advisory Board, Engineering Steering Committee, and Certification Committee.

Aarhus is a city of education, knowledge and research. Its university is internationally recognized for its contributions within, among other fields, social sciences, technology and science. Aarhus is known to attract talented students from around the world which also provides the city with a great diversity.

“Hosting the LibreOffice Conference will be an exciting opportunity for the entire Danish free software community”, says Leif Lodahl, a long time leader of the Danish LibreOffice community, a founder of The Document Foundation, and the architect of several large migration projects to LibreOffice. “We are looking forward to welcoming LibreOffice volunteers and advocates from every corner of the world”.

Support The Document Foundation

LibreOffice users, free software advocates and community members can support The Document Foundation with a donation at http://donate.libreoffice.org. Money collected will be used to strengthen the foundation, support development related activities such as QA and localization, expand the infrastructure, and accelerate marketing activities to increase the awareness of the project, both at global and local level.

2014/10/16

100,000 thanks

Filed under: Community, Foundation — italovignoli @ 09:38

100,000 donations in 500 days, from May 1st, 2013, to October 13, 2014, with an average of 200 donations per day.

Three square numbers which have a greater meaning than their actual one, for the entire free software ecosystem.

Together with volunteers, contributing their time, and Advisory Board members, investing in The Document Foundation, individual donors are making the dream of an independent self-sustaining free software foundation – capable of pushing the best free office suite to the next level of awesomeness – a solid, enduring reality.

Back in 2010, when the independent foundation was announced, one of the most frequent objections was based on the false assumption that a large free software project cannot exist without a single large corporate sponsor.

After four years, we can not only affirm that the dream has come true, but that the dream has a bright future.

Thanks to donations, we have been able to fund hackfests (like the upcoming one in Toulouse, France, on November 15/16), QA volunteer netbooks for bug triage, tinderboxes for developers, improvements of ask.libreoffice.org for non-english users, LibreOffice booths at exhibitions, native language community events, a stronger independent infrastructure, and so on.

What is more important, we have been able to demonstrate that a large free software project does not need a single large corporate sponsor to thrive, but can rely on a diverse ecosystem based on companies but also on volunteers, supported by individual donors.

Companies come and go, while volunteers – and hopefully individual donors – stay.

So far, they have had the unique power of making a ten year long dream come true, and become history. With a simple donation at http://donate.libreoffice.org, they can keep the history alive, forever.

100,000 thanks, again.

2014/07/21

Membership Committee upcoming election

Filed under: Announcements, Community, Foundation — Florian Effenberger @ 09:36

Thorsten Behrens, Chairman of the Board at The Document Foundation, has announced the elections for the Membership Committee.

Dear Community,

all members of The Document Foundation are called to vote on a new Membership Committee. Therefore, the Board of Directors hereby announces the elections to the Membership Committee with the following timeline:

  1. 2014-07-19: announcement of the elections (this e-mail); and start of the nomination phase
  2. 2014-08-27, 24:00 CET/UTC+2: end of the nomination phase
  3. 2014-09-04, 00:00 CET/UTC+2: official start of the elections
  4. 2014-09-11, 24:00 CET/UTC+2: end of the elections
  5. 2014-09-12: announcement of the preliminary results; and start of the challenging phase
  6. 2014-09-17, 24:00 CET/UTC+2: end of the challenging phase
  7. 2014-09-18: official announcement of the final results
  8. 2014-09-19: new Membership Committee officially in charge

Members of The Document Foundation as of 2014-07-01 are eligible to vote in the elections, and any eligible voter can also be elected to the Membership Committee. Members may self-nominate.

To announce your candidacy, send a message to board-discuss@documentfoundation.org with your full name, e-mail, corporate affiliation (if any), and a description of your reasons for
wanting to serve as a committee member. All candidates should also send a summary of their candicacy announcement to elections@documentfoundation.org – a compilation of the summaries will be mailed to all registered voters prior to the elections. Summaries should be no more than 75 words of continuous text (so no bullet lists or multiple paragraphs) and must be received by the nomination deadline given above.

Available slots will be filled by a single transferable vote system, seats filled in decreasing order of preference. This election is according to our statutes, and the term of office is two years.

All discussion related to the elections should be held on board-discuss@documentfoundation.org where members are invited to ask questions to one or all candidates. Instructions explaining how to vote will be sent via e-mail to all eligible voters in time before the election.

The board will announce preliminary results as soon as possible after the elections close, along with instructions on how to access the votes archive and how to independently verify the vote count.

Any eligible voter may challenge the preliminary results by e-mailing elections@documentfoundation.org within the aforementioned deadline. Once any challenges have been resolved, the board shall announce the final results.

Any questions regarding these procedures should be directed to the board by e-mail to elections@documentfoundation.org

We are looking forward to all candidacies, and would like to thank you for your work, engagement and dedication for The Document Foundation!

On behalf of the Board of Directors,
Thorsten Behrens

2014/04/17

LibreOffice Conference 2015 Call for Locations will open soon

Filed under: Community, Conference, Foundation, LibreOffice — italovignoli @ 10:48

Berlin, April 16, 2014 – The Document Foundation (TDF) will open the Call for Locations for the LibreOffice Conference 2015 on May 1st, 2014. Candidate cities will be able to submit proposals during May and June 2014. Details of the Call for Locations are available on the TDF Wiki: https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Events/2015/LibreOffice_Annual_Conference/Call_for_Location.

The location of the 2015 LibreOffice Conference will be announced at the end of July, so that the winning team may attend the 2014 LibreOffice Conference in Bern, Switzerland (September 2nd to September 5th).

“The LibreOffice Conference is a large event, which spans over four days and is a unique gathering opportunity for our growing community. Starting from 2014, we intend to present next year location at the previous conference”, says Thorsten Behrens, Chairman of The Document Foundation. “This also offers a chance to involve next year’s team during the last phase of the organization, in order to ensure that they are acquainted with the process”.

For additional information: conference@libreoffice.org.

2013/12/24

Results Elections TDF Board of Directors

Filed under: Announcements, Community, Foundation — Florian Effenberger @ 09:40

Cor Nouws posted this today:

Dear members,

I hereby announce the final results of The Document Foundation’s Board of Directors elections 2013. With the challenging phase having ended without any objection to the preliminary results, the following results are now the final ones.

Elected as member are the candidates, in this order: Thorsten Behrens, Eliane Domingos de Sousa, Michael Meeks, Fridrich Strba, Adam Fyne, Joel Madero and Bjoern Michaelsen.
And as deputies: Andreas Mantke, Eike Rathke and Norbert Thiebaud.

I want to say thanks to all those who ran for elections, also the members that were not elected for the board this time, and congratulations to those that were elected. By separate mail each one elected, will be invited to accept the new role as Member (or Deputy) of the Board of Directors.

As outlined in the initial announcement, the newly elected Board of Directors will only be in charge from February 18, 2014 on. To help the transition, the current Board of Directors will include them in the decision making process.

On behalf of the Membership Committee,
Cor Nouws, Chairman

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